Movement Towards Privatizing Post Office Continues and Other Top USPS Stories of the Week

Save the Postal Service_S1789_Winston-Salem3Movement Towards Privatizing Post Office Continues by Melissa Landon for PopularResistance.org

Because the U.S. Postal Service will change its staffing policies in September, as many as 3,300 postmasters could lose their full-time jobs. The policy involves shortening post-office hours and providing more part-time positions and fewer full-time ones. “By October, the institution of the small-town career postmaster will become a thing of the past at almost half the country’s post offices,” says SavethePostOffice.com. (Hat tip to the Daily Yonder)

Around 8,800 post offices have already cut some hours during the past year and one half, 300 have scheduled public meetings and 3,900 have not scheduled a meeting or implemented any such changes. “If implementation continues at the current rate (about a hundred a month), some 600 of these post offices will have their hours reduced during the spring and summer,” SavethePostOffice says. To see an interactive map showing post offices planning to reduce services, click here. Read more from popularristance.org here.

Postal Service is Profitable, Doesn’t Need to Cut Service by Ron Berry for Gannett Central Wisconsin Media

There is a movement currently in Congress to reduce the services of the U.S. Postal Service to the point where it will become no longer worth saving.
This movement is originating in the U.S. House of Representatives, which is basically controlled by the anti-everything-government members of the Tea Party wing of the Republican Party. This movement is being pursued through the efforts of Rep. Darrell Issa, R-Calif., who is the chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, which has a huge say in USPS operations.

The strategy being used by the USPS opponents is to implement changes to delivery methods and to issue misinformation about the financial situation of the USPS. For starters, Issa wants to stop Saturday delivery and then eliminate house-to-house delivery in the majority of America. This will be accomplished by installing Neighborhood Delivery Cluster Units at intersections of city blocks and, wherever possible, in rural areas. Read the rest of this article here.

USPS Needs Real Reform, Not More Austerity by APWU

The Postal Service needs real reform — not the austerity proposed by Rep. Darrell Issa (R-CA) and the White House, APWU President Mark Dimondstein said after an April 8 hearing by a House committee. The hearing of the Oversight and Government Reform Committee, which Rep. Issa chairs, focused on White House budget items concerning the Postal Service. Unfortunately, Issa found a lot to like in the administration’s proposals.

President Dimondstein’s remarks are below:

“Yesterday’s hearing by the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, focused on a White House budget that would harm service, drive away business, and eliminate jobs. It calls for the immediate end of Saturday delivery and would allow the Postal Service to begin to shift from door delivery to centralized delivery. Many of the concepts in the administration’s budget can be found in H.R. 2748, a bill sponsored by Rep. Darrell Issa.

“The proposed budget also fails to eliminate the pre-funding requirement of the Postal Accountability and Enhancement Act, which is the fundamental cause of the Postal Service’s manufactured financial crisis. Instead, it would simply restructure the payments. The pre-funding requirement is consistently cited as justification for shuttering mail processing plants, lowering service standards and slowing the mail.” Read the rest of this APWU story here.

Other stories of interest:

Issa Embraces White House Plan for Postal Reform

Republicans, White House Finally Agree on Something

In Defense of the United States Postal Service

Darrell Issa Continues War Against the U.S. Postal Service

APWU: Staples Deal Still a Secret

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