News of Our Revamped Website and My Response to More Misleading Information About the Postal Service

Some musings today. First of all, I would like to direct you to our newly revamped website, The North Carolina Letter Carrier (nclettercarrier.com). This is one of the reasons I haven’t been posting as much here–busy, busy, busy putting all of this new stuff on the website. I’ve been like a kid in a candy store since the beginning of the year. I don’t know if you’ve ever visited the site, but I feel like the new setup is an improvement over what we’ve had over the last couple of years. Take a tour and see what you think. If you don’t like what you see, don’t let me know. I don’t want you bursting my bubble.

Now, on to another topic. Earlier today I wrote yet another letter to The High Point Enterprise in response to misinformation from an op-ed piece that ran earlier this month. I didn’t find the content surprising since it was written by conservative pundit Thomas Sowell, but, alas, I did find it irritating.

Let me share with you a few excerpts that I found especially galling.

“…although the Postal Service is technically a private business, its income doesn’t cover all its costs–and taxpayers are on the hook for the difference. Moreover, the government makes it illegal for anyone else to put anything into your mail box, even though you bought the mail box and it is your property.”

Elsewhere: “What should be the fate of the Postal Service in the United States? In a sense, no one really knows. Nor is there any reason why they should. The real answer to the question whether the Postal Service is worth what it is costing can be found only when various indirect government subsidies stop and when the government stops forbidding others from carrying the mail–if that ever happens.

“If FedEx, UPS or someone else can carry the mail cheaper or better than the Postal Service, there is no reason why the public should not get the benefit of having their mail delivered cheaper or better.”

And finally, in conclusion: “That is why the post office should have to face competition in the market, instead of lobbying politicians for government help. We cannot preserve everything that was once useful.”

Those are just some of the low-lights from the piece. Can you understand why I had to double-up on my blood pressure medicine? It’s a sad commentary on our society that people like this are actually paid to write such foolishness. If you think you have the intestinal fortitude to read the whole thing, you can find it here.

The problem with responding to something like this is two-fold. Number one, I have to restrain myself from expressing my true emotions in response to something like this lest I embarrass my wife, my children, and myself when it’s printed in the paper. And secondly, respondees to columns like this are limited to 300 words. They get several hundred, you only get 300. Frustrating.

So, I got my emotions under control, whittled my letter down to 300 words and sent it off to the paper. I’ve made myself a promise that I will respond to every letter and every article that appears in the paper that contains misinformation about the Postal Service.

I guess it’s good I can only write a letter to them every two weeks, otherwise I might be fully occupied writing letters to the editor.

Oh, did you see the news that came out on Monday? A new poll shows that 84 percent of the American people disapprove of Congress’s performance. I don’t find that surprising. What I do find surprising, and disheartening, is that 16 percent of the people either approve of what they’re doing, or don’t care.

Sad.


 

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